News - MMA in the Media

Criminalising ukuthwala: Who will act against the perpetrators?

In the wake of the recent approval by President Jacob Zuma of the new human trafficking Act, MMA’s Lusanda Ngcaweni says the Act may as well not exist unless it is enforced. The article relates stories of girls and women who experienced ukuthwala and were interviewed in the Eastern Cape as part of MMA’s research project entitled “The Girl-Child & Ukuthwala: Misappropriated Cultural Practices and their Contribution to Human Trafficking in South Africa”. The report is due to be released later this year.

Sexwale divorce: The naming of names is a difficult matter, writes William Bird

William Bird, Director of Media Monitoring Africa (MMA), discusses the dynamics of the naming of parties involved in a divorce case and the publication of details thereof by the media. Using the Tokyo Sexwale divorce story as published by The Star and Sunday Times newspapers, Bird discusses the rights and the wrongs of publishing such information and what the law says regarding such publication.

Saturday Star tells MMA’s Tangled Trafficking Tale

MMA’s Child Protection & Trafficking programme head, Melanie Hamman, was recently published in the Saturday Star (11/02/2012, p11) In the article Melanie speaks about the subtle hidden crime of human trafficking in South Africa.How when it occurs and is even reported on it is seldom seen or identified; and the importance of exposing it whenever it is found.

South Africa: Lack of reporting on gender-based violence

Media Monitoring Africa (MMA) has questioned the media’s priority in dealing with issues facing women, especially gender-based violence and representation of women in media.

MMA highlights lack of reporting on gender-based violence

Yesterday, Tuesday, 8 March 2011, which was International Women’s Day, Media Monitoring Africa (MMA) questioned the media’s priority in dealing with issues facing women, especially gender-based violence and representation of women in media.

It pointed out that the epidemic of rhino poaching has been very present in media headlines and coverage - showing an increase in deaths from 133 in 2009 to 333 in 2010 - but that in the same period, 197 000 cases of crimes against women were reported to SAPS, including murder, attempted murder, common assault, sexual offences and assault to cause grievous bodily harm. It is worth noting that these are only the ones reported. The figures according to the “one in nine campaign” are likely to be ten times higher.

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